Guitars

Building the Beast - Custom DIY Guitar Effects Pedalboard

I love guitar effects pedals. Oh mah science, do I love guitar pedals. I love 'em! Give me more! It's a bit of an addiction. I've had a lot, I still have a lot, and I want more. Pedals, pedals, PEDALS! I think you're starting to see the picture here: pedals = good. :)

This is the story of my latest guitar effects pedalboard build, including the successes and failures.

Jim Dunlop Eric Johnson Classic Jazz III Picks

When I was 17, my jazz choir teacher introduced me to the Jim Dunlop Jazz III guitar pick (in black, incidentally). From then on, I was hooked. When I wasn't strumming or swinging my whole arm for Texas bluesy goodness, I had a black or red Jazz III in my hand. It was especially great for jazz as I could hybrid pick for comping...that was before I even know what hybrid picking was.

Fast forward a nearly a decade and a half.

Tips And Tricks

This is intended to be a living document, so check back often for new tips and tricks to help your guitar playing. These appear in no particular order.

Use a metronome when you practice. This helps establish consistent timing, accuracy, and synchronization between your left and right hands. Your playing will improve much faster by using a metronome. You can also build up speed by slowly increasing the tempo in small increments such as 8bpm at a time.

Major Scale and Arpeggio - Shape 3

Illustrated in A Major

The Shape 3 Major Scale is an alternate moveable root-6 (meaning that the 6th string contains the root of the scale) major scale. This example is illustrated in A major and should be practiced in all available positions. [[{"type":"media", "view_mode":"media_large", "fid":"20", "attributes":{"class":"media-image", "typeof":"foaf:Image", "style":""}}]]

Scale Fingerings

[[{"type":"media", "view_mode":"media_large", "fid":"21", "attributes":{"class":"media-image", "typeof":"foaf:Image", "style":""}}]]

Major Scale and Arpeggio - Shape 2

Illustrated in C Major

The Shape 2 Major Scale is a moveable root-5 (meaning that the 5th string contains the root of the scale) major scale. This example is illustrated in C major and should be practiced in all available positions. [[{"type":"media", "view_mode":"media_large", "fid":"15", "attributes":{"class":"media-image", "typeof":"foaf:Image", "style":""}}]]

Scale Fingerings

[[{"type":"media", "view_mode":"media_large", "fid":"16", "attributes":{"class":"media-image", "typeof":"foaf:Image", "style":""}}]]

Major Scale and Arpeggio - Shape 1

Illustrated in G Major

The Shape 1 Major Scale is a moveable root-6 (meaning that the 6th string contains the root of the scale) major scale. This example is illustrated in G major and should be practiced in all available positions. [[{"type":"media", "view_mode":"media_large", "fid":"10", "attributes":{"class":"media-image", "typeof":"foaf:Image", "style":""}}]]

Scale Fingerings

[[{"type":"media", "view_mode":"media_large", "fid":"11", "attributes":{"class":"media-image", "typeof":"foaf:Image", "style":""}}]]

Warm Up Exercises Part 1

I'm calling this post "Warm Up Exercises Part 1" because I suspect that I will come up with other warm up exercises later, so this will be the first installment. I'd like to share these because, while these are not difficult, challenging, or groundbreaking, had I known how to use them years ago, I would be a much better guitarist today.

Simplifying Chord Changes For Soloing

One of the things that overwhelmed me when I first tried soloing over changes in jazz was how fast the chord changes often pass. How could I change scales that quickly and express anything? An instructor I worked with years ago taught me a way to simplify a series of changes by looking at what key the chords are implying. Here's how you do it.

First, let's look at the A section (the head) of Line For Lyons by Gerry Mulligan:

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Guitars